Americans hide Christmas presents in a few obvious places: Find out if your spot is safe

Hiding Christmas presents is not an easy feat when you live with the gift recipient. And with few options available, most people are reduced to hiding presents in a few obvious spots at home.

If you’re looking to find a place where your gifts won’t be accidentally or intentionally discovered, take a look at this comprehensive holiday survey from Neighbor. The self-storage company commissioned a survey from Pollfish.com, which surveyed 1,000 Americans ages 16 and up, and found where people commonly hide and find presents.

THIS IS THE MOST COMMON DAY AMERICANS DECORATE FOR THE HOLIDAYS

The five most common hiding spots are bedroom closets (53%), spare rooms (31.5%), coat closets (26%), under beds (26%) and car trunks (25%).

Other notable hiding spots survey respondents named include spare drawers or cabinets (17%), basements (16%), garages (15%), under couches (14%), someone else’s house (14%), attics (13%), inside desks (11%), somewhere outdoors (11%), kid’s rooms (10%), sheds (10%) and bathrooms (9%). 

Less than 1 in 10 – 8.5% – said they actually use a storage unit to hide presents.

HOW BIG IS SANTA CLAUS? HERE’S HOW TO ANSWER THAT QUESTION FOR KIDS

Despite all the effort that goes into gift concealment, impatient gift recipients of all ages are searching for Christmas presents. According to Neighbor’s survey, most gift snoopers first look in bedroom closets (25%), under beds (22%), in car trunks (15%), in coat closets (9%), in kid’s rooms (6%) and spare rooms (6%).

The remaining 17% are searching for their gifts in basements, attics, various pieces of furniture or outside. 

Most people who have successfully found their Christmas presents ahead of the holiday told Neighbor they discovered it in a bedroom closet (26%), a car trunk (21%) or a spare room (10%). 

Less than 1 in 10 have found presents in a coat closet (9%), under a bed (8%), in a spare drawer or cabinet (4%), in a garage (3%), in a basement (2%) or in an attic (2%). Meanwhile, 15% said they’ve found presents in "another location."

CABBAGE PATCH KIDS TO TICKLE ME ELMO: THE CHRISTMAS TOY GIFTS THAT MADE PARENTS SCRAMBLE 

Even though some gift recipients have had their Christmas surprises spoiled by finding presents in common household areas, a little more than half of Neighbor’s survey respondents believe they’re good at hiding presents.

Roughly 50.1% said they "have never had gifts found" while 49.9% said they "have had gifts found."

The Christmas season for 2021 is projected to be a big one with the United States Postal Service expecting to deliver 12 billion letters, cards and packages throughout the country. 



TAGS: Americans hide Christmas presents in a few obvious places Find out if your spot is safe


03 Dec 2021 03:26   |    242

Source: www.foxnews.com


But give glad tidings to those who believe and work righteousness, that their portion is Gardens, beneath which rivers flow. Every time they are fed with fruits therefrom, they say: "Why, this is what we were fed with before," for they are given things in similitude; and they have therein spouses purified; and they abide therein (for ever).  (The Cow   25)


POPULAR NEWS

New York mom reunited with officer and paramedic who helped deliver baby on Christmas Eve
Father of TV reporter who was killed on air runs for Congress in Virginia
‘Charlie’s Angels’ star Jaclyn Smith, 76, reveals the secret behind that youthful Instagram photo
Stefanik hauls in $10 million in 2021, breaking records and continuing GOP trend
Democrats throw Manchin, Sinema under the bus and court electoral disaster
Kemp edges Perdue in Georgia GOP gubernatorial primary; Walker running away with Senate nomination: poll
San Jose approves gun owners liability insurance
Russia-Ukraine crisis already paying dividends for Putin
Criminals are targeting cops at historic levels following calls to defund the police
COVID -- facts, fiction and fear
House Democrats exit list grows to 29 as longtime Rep. Jim Cooper of Tennessee announces retirement
To deter Putin in Ukraine, Biden must stand up to the Russian strongman
Peanut allergy could be tamed in some kids using oral immunotherapy: study
Pennsylvania football coach sends athletes to shovel elderly driveways instead of practice
Texas police officer rescues woman trapped in burning car, bodycam video shows
Texas 98-year-old WWII veteran receives high school diploma
Allowing aliens to vote in New York City violates state law and devalues citizenship
Glenn Youngkin is off to a strong start on schools in Virginia
Stephanie Seymour shares heartbreaking tribute to son Harry Brant one year after his death at age 24
Fauci, COVID-19 origins to be investigated if House flips back to GOP control in 2022: Jim Jordan

Email subscription:

Related Lifestyle News